A recent study by EURAGE members Melanie Vauclair and Sibila Marques showed that the stereotypical perception of older people as being nice, but not so competent—which has been found to be pervasive across cultures and nations—is equally pervasive across different young age groups (6-10 and 11-14 years), developing in children as young as 6. The results of this study have inspired the EURAGE members to design an anti-ageism intervention study with the aim of reducing stereotypical beliefs about senior citizens as ´doddering, but dear´ among young adolescents.  

Leave a CommentTrackbackEdit

Coming soon (follow us on twitter @EURAGE to keep up-to-date): Libby Cuthbert joined a discussion on AgeUK’s ‘The Wireless’ to discuss whether ageism still exists in business. The radio programme discusses anecdotal experiences of ageism in the workplace plus related legislation, research and psychological processes.

Leave a CommentTrackbackEdit

A number of the EURAGE team made their way to New Orleans last week to present at the 66th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Gerontological Society of America. Dr Hannah Swift chaired the symposium “Social Psychological Perspectives on the Implications of Ageism for Health and for Health Care Professionals”. This distinctive symposium highlighted how ageism should be of concern within the health care setting. Dr Paul Nash demonstrated the need to look at health professionals implicit attitudes towards older adults which are not always in line with their explicitly expressed attitudes. EURAGE member, Ruth Lamont discussed how negative ageing stereotypes of declining competence are prevalent. Ruth’s presentation compiled a body of literature showing that these stereotypes can negatively affect the actual competencies of older adults. Hannah presented findings from her analysis of the European Social Survey. Her analyses showed that as older people´s age-identification increases, they report worse health, but only in countries where older people are perceived to have lower status. Libby Cuthbert also discussed how positive and negative contact with older residents in care individually relate to work satisfaction among carers, and their ageist attitudes. Each of these talks highlighted the significant impact that attitudes to age can have within the health care setting. Many thanks to Professor James Goodwin, head of research at AgeUK, for his contributions as discussant.

Leave a CommentTrackbackEdit

In May 2013 Dr Swift was invited to discuss and debate about the perceived inevitability of ageism in society on BBC Radio Devon. In addition, in July 2013 Dr Swift contributed to a discussion on BBC Radio Essex. The discussion looked at ageism and the travel insurance industry, which explored how insurers use age as a proxy for risk and whether this is legitimate and justified, or ageist and results in discrimination. With increasing discussion of ageing issues in the media, the EURAGE team aims to create an awareness of how our attitudes towards ageing may affect older adults.  

Leave a CommentTrackbackEdit

EURAGE member Ruth Lamont attended the July 2013 conference ‘Ageing and physical activity: Rethinking approaches’ where international researchers and policy makers discussed the role of physical activity in later life. Cassandra Phoenix and Noreen Orr demonstrated the narrative approach to encouraging active living with the ESRC funded ‘Moving Stories Project’. Diane Whaley discussed inter-group and intra-group diversity in later life and the deficient grouping of people as ‘older adults’ within research. Emanuelle Tulle highlighted how our social location can determine what activities we do and don’t engage with, and more specifically examined how master athletes have overcome/changed these boundaries. The two day conference delivered a number of stimulating talks and opportunities for discussion.

Leave a CommentTrackbackEdit

Latest News

Links

FUTURAGE Academy of Social Sciences
Age UK ESS
Website by Mark Langdale